30 Days of Homeschool – Day 17: Effective Communication

*(reminder: 1 – this is just 1 of my 30 posts about free resources for homeschool)

Earlier this morning, I read this article, about effective communication in business, on Inc. and thought it fits perfectly with schooling at home – some great words to heed.

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30 Days of Homeschool – Day 14: Free Curricula

(reminder – 1. this is about free resources for homeschool, in 30 non-consecutive posts…meaning: there won’t be a post every day, but there will be 30 🙂

PREFACE/ENCOURAGEMENT/PONTIFICATION: There are those who like to use what they have, some like to unschool, some like to buy this and that, and still others like the framework provided by a curriculum. This is for those of you who prefer the last option, yet don’t want to spend the money on it.

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Quotes from John Taylor Gatto

John Taylor Gatto was named “New York State Teacher of the Year” in 1992. After years and years of teaching, he left because of what he learned he was teaching, what was actually going on in public schools.
 
 
Here are some quotes from this phenomenal teacher:
 
“Whatever an education is, it should make you a unique individual, not a conformist; it should furnish you with an original spirit with which to tackle the big challenges; it should allow you to find values which will be your road map through life; it should make you spiritually rich, a person who loves whatever you are doing, wherever you are, whomever you are with; it should teach you what is important, how to live and how to die.”
 
“By preventing a free market in education, a handful of social engineers – backed by the industries that profit from compulsory schooling: teacher colleges, textbook publishers, materials suppliers, et al. – has ensured that most of our children will not have an education, even though they may be thoroughly schooled.”
 
“…‘How will they learn to read?’ you ask, and my answer is ‘Remember the lessons of Massachusetts.’ When children are given whole lives instead of age-graded ones in cellblocks, they learn to read, write, and do arithmetic with ease, if those things make sense in the kind of life that unfolds around them.”

“I’ve come to believe that genius is an exceedingly common human quality, probably natural to most of us…  I began to wonder, reluctantly, whether it was possible that being in school itself was what was dumbing them down. Was it possible I had been hired not to enlarge children’s power, but to diminish it? That seemed crazy on the face of it, but slowly I began to realize that the bells and the confinement, the crazy sequences, the age-segregation, the lack of privacy, the constant surveillance, and all the rest of national curriculum of schooling were designed exactly as if someone had set out to prevent children from learning how to think and act, to coax them into addiction and dependent behavior.”